About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 36
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
and welcome. five months after the uprising after colonel gaddafi's roll, britain has recognized the rebel council as the new government of libya. the u.s., france, and more than 30 other countries have recognized the council. our world affairs editor has this assessment. >> the libyan embassy in central london. a hugely valuable piece of real estate. the siege as usual by a small, ever present group of demonstrators. they were overjoyed by britain's decision to recognize them. this is tripoli where the heart of the city was the green square is decorated with a gigantic portrait of colonel gaddafi himself. he has never been a man to shrink from self publicity. britain, which was keenest about bombing libya has decided to cut the last remaining diplomatic links. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new diplomat to take over the embassy in london. >> britain has joined 29 other countries in recognizing the national transitional council. france did so at the start. germany, turkey, and
, britain's crucial wall it need civil war." good to have you on this program. let me start by asking you what there is to value or appreciate about the british role? why should we care about the british rule, what they thought about the civil war? >> it is very hard to even believe that, once upon a time, britain was the most powerful country on the planet. in the 1860's, it mattered. which side britain chose would determine the course of the war. at the beginning, britain went neutral credit that allowed the role of the south to do get out. they spend the rest of the war .rying to change britain's mind more than that, the southern coast was located by federal ships. the only way it would get its arms and medicines and volunteers from of is if they wanted over. they equated those block gators and give themselves a lifeline for almost two years -- they either aided -- they eveaded those blockaders and gave themselves a wi-fi from most years. was hours away neutral on a war that was over the instrument of black people. when they did get involved, they took the side of the south. how my sup
for this to end. >> this is newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. >> i am in london libya has condemned britain's decision to expel all of colonel khadafy's lipitor -- diplomats after recognizing the transitional council as the libyan government. >> norway has launched an independent inquiry into friday said the attacks. >> let's get more on that story now. thomas edgar was one of the first journalist on the scene after last friday's mass killing on the island. he says police reacted relatively quickly, despite criticism of their response time. >> there seems to be a lot of tension, especially among the journalists. in my opinion, they had two options. one was to wait for the helicopters being scrambled from one of the army bases, which was outside of oslo, then to get a pickup point, load their gear, flight to the island, etc. or they could go directly to the island, which is approximately 35 kilometers outside oslo. what police have been repeatedly saying house -- the last couple of days is that they made the right decision. they just jump in the car and made their way to the island and were
to the phone hacking scandal by closing down britain's best-selling sunday newspaper. but the investigation continues, with reports that a former editor and adviser to the british prime minister is to be arrested. dozens are killed in days of violent clashes between rival political groups in the pakistan city of karachi. and a final flight for the u.s. space shuttle atlantis. it prepares for its final journey to the stars. this is newsday. >> hello and welcome. it is the phone hacking scandal which has stunned britain. today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, "news of the world," is being shut down. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire, which controls 40% of circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the news at the paper that became thoroughly rotte
by closing down britain's best-selling sunday newspaper. the investigation continues with your porch with former adviser to the prime minister. >> dozens are killed in days of violent clashes in the pakistani city of karachi. >> and special atlantis prepares for its last journey to the stars. >> it is 9:00 a.m. in singapore. >> and it is to a.m. here in london. this is newsday. >> hello and welcome paired it is the phone hacking scandal that has stunned britain and today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling sunday newspaper "the news of the world" is being shut down by murdoch's news international. the closure comes after a public outcry. but it has not lifted the spot line of the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulations in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. the bbc business editor robert preston starts our coverage. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper which was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual, by all means. but you cannot forget. >> he may have well have made the remarks about the n
war when britain's survival was in the balance. out in the atlantic, the convoy brought essential supplies, the food without which the population would stop, the munitions without which the war werwould collapse. there were sunk by german ships. nazi germany was in danger of winning. britain desperately needed a break through to survive. it happen here in secluded countryside 40 miles north of london. this is quiet and rather overlooked now, but, 70 years ago, these prefabricated huts were part of one of britain's most secret and model assumptions. it was here that britain broke the codes of the german military. the most brilliant mathematician, crosscourt experts, and linguists were brought together to tackle the intercepted messages of this, the supposedly impenetrable german cipher machine called enigma. the british built this, called colossus. this is a replica of it. it is generally considered to be the world's first computer. with its coats, which had taken codebreakers six days to crack by hand, it could now be crack in a matter of hours. >> we would have lost a war. it is
an appeal at against extradition from britain to sweden. he is accused of sexual offenses. his lawyers told the high court in london that the description of the charges were misleading and unfair. he denies any wrongdoing. still to come on the program, more on the u.k. phone-hacking scandal, what it means for media relationships around the world. >> breyer earth elements are crucial, but to controls the lion's share of production? police and guatemalans have arrested two men in the collection of argentine singer. he was one of the most respected folk singers. his car was ambushed. >> he gave voice to millions of the disenfranchised latin america is back on home soil. after his violent killing in guatemala city last week, the argentine folk singer was returned or he will be mourned the most. they also have questions about how a musician once named the u.n. peace envoy could have been brutally murdered. >> we know there is an investigation about the person who drove the car. if anything more further from the ideals of time, it will be violence or anything related to the drug cartels. >> the a
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more into a fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of tha
robinson reports. >> end to britain's most powerful, most feared media going you will. the policemen are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take that -- them into questioning. that fell into a crew of m.p.'s. his wife was behind him. offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously at his side throughout. >> i would like to say how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> rupert murdoch was determined to deliver one key line. >> i would just like to say one sentence -- this is the most humbling day of my life. thank you. >> they were sorry, they were humble but whose fault was the criminality in their company? >> do you accept that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who is responsible? >> the people they trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> who that was he wasn't say. >> this is not an excuse. maybe it's an explanation. news world is less than 1 -- news corp is less than 1% of our company. i employ 53,000 people around the world. >> at this point his wife patrolleded him to stop banging t
in britain. >> fox is a very conservative media outlet, it takes a conservative bent and sides with republicans routinely, against the democrats. i think there has been a lot of liberal anger at mr. murdoch over the years. i also think there have been liberal politicians, democrats, who have been more loath to criticize mr. murdoch in the past, or fox, for fear of having some of the kind of repercussions that british politicians were also afraid of. they do not become targets of fox news. >> in congress, concerns are growing, especially after the suggestion, still unsubstantiated, that news of the world journalists may have been hacking the phones of 9/11 victims. calls have been made to the department of justice and the securities and exchange commission to investigate the allegations. u.s. companies are banned from paying bribes to foreign officials. >> last week when the story broke, this became an interesting story to americans. we found it titillating, fascinating, but it was not necessarily penetrating the consciousness of the greater american public. this week, on the ot
of them including france and britain, do have sympathy for the palestinian position. however, they do not want an american veto. they are afraid it could become violent in the occupied territories and that could, perhaps, get entangled in the protest of the wider arab world. that has not happened yet. so far, the air of spring has been very focused on internal issues. -- the era of the spring has been very focused on internal issues. america's standing in the region could take a hard hit, and the western states, too. the europeans are looking for a compromise, trying to convince the destiny is to drop their bid for membership, but to give them enough to get back to the peace process. whether or not they succeed, there is a sense that the arab- israeli conflict is becoming a major issue at the u.n. again and it will dominate in the coming months. >> britain has joined france in suggesting colonel gadhafi could remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. the british foreign secretary has been holding talks with his french counterpart. he said it was up to the libya -- libyan pe
for an extra 185 million pounds immediately. the international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million pounds to somalia this year. united states has given barely half of that. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring the alarm bells. >> contributions from other countries has been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead. we expect others to contribute. there are signs others are beginning. we need that to happen rapidly and vigorously. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken hold in areas controlled or influenced by militant islamist group. they made it too dangerous for foreign aid groups to operate directly. they say a ban has been lifted, but the politics are competen-- complicated and aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. the familiar images of hunger and helplessness. the predictable scramble for money and access as famine bites into somalia. erson isast one p reported to have been killed in malawi in demonstrations against the government. despite an earlier court ruling banning protests, protests have continued. th
to britain at age 10. his father was a broadcaster and politician. his early work was thrillism. he had a one-man show at age 21. but these are not just bodies. he said he wanted to paint people, their hopes, memories, how they happened to be. >> in our computer age, in a way he reinforces what is special and unique about painting. >> he was never flattering, never one to hide a blemish or able to. he painted bodies as he saw them. not even the queen was scared. models often had to endure unbearably long sittings, and they were more often than not friends, lovers, and members of his own family. >> i do not want to use them for an idea i have. i actually want to do them and even their identical twin would not do at all if i did not know them. >> he had a large family. these are just two of his daughters, but is thought that he fathered dozens of children throughout his life. his legacy? he was britain's cozy preeminent painter of the nude. in an age of abstract art, he brought the power of paint and the human form laid bare. >> you have been watching news day from the bbc. >> that is it from u
. the u.n. chief, the u.s. come up in the u.k. have all condemned the violence. britain which was what the biggest aid donor last week -- which was the biggest aid donors suspended their payments. this makes an end to the protests of the more difficult in all of the world's poorest countries. -- in one of the world's poorest countries. >> this is "newsday," on the bbc. >> the headlines this hour. european leaders have agreed to a second loan for greece with banks and private investors contributing more than $150 billion. >> james murdoch has rejected claims that he gave mistaken evidence to british members of parliament. the claims for made by former senior executives of the "news of the world," newspaper. who owns the south china seas? this is a simple enough question but the answer is complicated. a number of countries claim ownership. hillary clinton has arrived in bali where the asean group of nations has been discussing the contentious issue of maritime boundaries. it is believed that the south china sea is rich in oil and gas. countries in the region are competing with each other
gets under way, britain has promised to intelligence cooperation. eyewitness accounts and analysis will all be fed in. the questions are, who was behind this and why. >> richard is on his way to the island. he has the latest details on the situation there. >> have actually got boats around the island now where the shooting took place. they are searching because they fear that there may be more bodies in the water. when the gunman opened fire, a very small island. there was huge panic. it is thought to be 600 or 700 people that were on the island at the time. some of them took the water, desperate to escape. some people tried to swim away. there is a fear that more bodies will be found in the water. there may also be more victims inside of the building where the bomb explosion took place in the mid afternoon. it is difficult for the emergency services to get inside the building. there is still a concern that there might be more bombs in the area, and there has been very significant damage to the building. it is dangerous for the emergency services again. >> the suspect who is in cus
the u.s. as a sort of place in peril britain was at the end of the 20 century. to discuss this, my colleague spoke to an economist, the author who left after taking part in protests in 1989, and a writer on risk in geopolitics. first, we take stock of how the land lies. >> the paramount fear -- the crowd is diverse the of all code come to take part in a production of a change their lives. they call it naturalization here. to you and me, that means becoming a u.s. citizen. cheesy, yes, to see one of the ceremonies is to grasp the essence of america. >> this is one of those only in america plummets. this is part of a living -- legal process. this is all wrapped into kind of a movie experience. it says, "i am honored to congratulate you on becoming a citizen of the united states. because of your determination, this great nation, is now your nation, sign, sincerely, barack obama." >> america is vexed by doubts, but that has not put them off. fresh blood is coming faster than ever before. >> the racism and everything you encounter, i don't feel that here. >> they give me so much freedom
that links the man accused of last friday's atrocity too right wing extremists in britain. the suspect was accused of holding meetings with such groups nine years ago, but the intelligence chief says that although investigations were continuing, she believed that he acted on his own in the planning of the bombing killed at least 76 people. of course, you can get much more on that story and the rest of the news we have been talking about on our website. for now, thank you very much for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles. 
that newspapers in britain play a very different role than they do here, because you don't have paid political advertising. you cannot run for office in britain without the support of a major newspaper chain. everybody needs murdoch's support. i think that eventually this is going to fade away. >> do you remember the phase willful blindness in connection with enron crimes? >> yes. it's looking the other way. >> do you think -- willful blindness will obtain in the case of prosecuting and perhaps convicting rupert? >> they may try. >> and his son. >> they may try. >> willful blind sentence. >> i don't think rupert has any -- hold it. i don't think rupert, as of now has any kind of criminal liability whatsoever. the people have a problem are below him. >> when you have a hot story, the editor, the people above say, how did you get that? it's diagnose to be very difficult to insulate the people at the top if these allegations prove true. >> let's see if we can >> thank you columbia, challenger, discovery, endeavour, and our ship atlantis. thank you for protecting us and bringing this program to su
defector. he says the general's death will make them more determined to push on to tripoli. britain gave its full backing to the rebel government, and the west hope they are right. >> tens of thousands of syrians have turned out again for protest across the country, demanding the president resigned. it has killed elise four people. the biggest rally appears to be in hamas. there was a report of of fighting in several other cities. here we have this report from damascus. >> people chant for the sake of god and we walk. people want the downfall of the regime. hear, the city that has witnessed the biggest conflict across the country, people have determined to they want the regime out. thousands of people took to the streets and decided that silence is killing us. -- here is a different scene. police used teargas to disperse protesters. this is it in a town that is a suburb of damascus. today, it blamed the past -- a blast for sabotage. using heavy helicopters where people were killed in the early hours of morning by security forces. they want to crack down on protests and it seems -- it doe
in britain as the phone hacking allegations continue to grow. john yates said he was wrong in 2009 not to reopen the investigation into phone hacking, but has acted with complete integrity. rupert murdoch alongside his son james murdoch and the chief executive of news international here in the u.k. will appear before parliamentary select committee at 2:30 u.k. time. you have been watching news on the bbc. thanks for watching. ♪ ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los presented by kcet los angeles.
, murdoch is much more dominant than in britain. hear, until about this absolutely pete, there was very little reporting about what was going on except for their competition. but they control most of the major newspapers outside of sydney and melbourne. his only real competition is in sydney and melbourne. it is a blanket coverage if they have. >> thank you for joining us, alan night from the university of technology in sydney. petrol bombs and bricks were thrown in belfast. officers used water cannons to control the crowd of up to 200 protesters on the night before the biggest day of the loyalists march. the latest from belfast. >> frankly, trouble had been expected but expected to come from the loyalist and the unionists and the protestant side of the community. it came and fat from the nationalist community, from a part of what that fast where they hijacked a bus, drove it don't -- drove it toward a police cordon designed to cape loyalists and republicans apart. they need to celebrate the highlight of the marching season bird on the 12th of july, and republicans have a standard becau
communications director, also the former editor of britain's biggest selling newspaper has been unveiled by police. the former u.s. first lady, betty ford, died at the age of 93. she was the wife of president gerald ford and served as first lady from 1974 to 1977. betty ford was best known for founding a leading california clinic for treating drug and i call addiction. president barack obama said she left a legacy of courage for others. >> ladies and gentlemen, president and mrs. gerald ford. >> gerald ford once said that he was indebted to no man and to only one woman, his wife betty ford. as first lady, she combined grace with candor, a candor that was tested just months after she moved into the white house when doctors discovered she had breast cancer and if -- and performed a mastectomy. her frank discussion about the ordeal is credited to learning women about the dangers of breast cancer. >> women are no longer ashamed of having mastectomies. they talk about it. i feel that i have saved many lives. >> she was known as betty plumber growing up in michigan and she dreamed of becoming
. they're all in place. everything is fine. we're not going back. >> britain's duke and duchess of cambridge celebrated canada day with thousands of people in the capital os awafment on the first day, prince william told the parliament on parliament hill he was excited of the prospect by coming part of the canadian family as they traveled around the country. from ottawa, we have this report. >> they are young and glamorous, which undoubtedly helps but to be a successful royal requires more. things like a sense of service and ability to connect with people, because that lifts them belong mere celebrity. william and kate arrived at the annual canada day celebration in a horse-drawn carriage. the crowds were large, the welcome once again enthusiastic. as the queen's representative in canada, the governor general mounted the podium, the crowd shouted for will and kate. they made their way to the stage giving the crowd a chance to see kate was wearing canada's national colors of red and white. canada's prime minister congratulated them on their marriage. the crowd cheered, dignitarie
sparked massive protest across the continent. britain has passed its own cost- cutting baggage. it comes after investors started to worry that the eurozone's third largest economy could be the next victim of the debt crisis. it goes to the lower house of parliament on friday. >> italy, ever aware of battles past, has been told it is now on the front line in the current battle over the eurozone crisis. the reason is that. -- the reason is debt. today, the italian senate debated an emergency austerity package, brought forward to calmed markets worried about italian debt. the italian finance minister told the senators the country was watching. he warned the public they could devour our future in the future of our children. passions ran high. public wages will now be frozen. the senate approved the measures and the italian parliament looks set to pass this budget in five days. >> we are reeling right now at the defense of the european currency. this is not against italy. it is against the eurozone. >> here is italy's problem. it is looking to make 42 billion pounds in savings over three year
at the heart of a very big, powerful organization, and maybe it extends across wider if journalism in britain. also affected are the police and politicians. there are some brave politicians saying now that politics should have been stronger on this issue. >> professor brian castcart there. the indian former minister arrived on wednesday for a three-day visit. he'll hold talks with officials from bangladesh on long standing issues. success there will pave the way for a high-profile visit by india's prime minister in september. our bangladesh correspondent there. >> india and bangladesh are supposed to be friendly neighbors, but they have a range of contentious issues, ranging from river waters to demarcation. the two south asian neighbors also shared more than 50 rivers, but bangladesh believes it's not getting enough water as india has built a number of dams upstream. the two sides are expected to reach an interim agreement on the water and the rivers during the visit of the india prime minister to bangladesh later this year. the two sides are also talking about giving transit access to each
sharma. lawmakers in britain will discuss the phone hacking scandal rocking news international. the court said they were partly to blame for the shevardnadze massacre. >> japan is to conduct tests on its nuclear plants. london.4:00 on this is "newsday." >> the british parliament has called an emergency debate about the phone hacking scandal surrounding news international. the action has prompted calls for a public inquiry. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians were informed their telephones had been hacked. now a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world hacked her phone while she was missing and some messages have been deleted in the process. david cameron and made his feelings clear cari >> if they are true, this is a dreadful act and a dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite shocking, that someone could do this, knowing that the police were trying to find this person and trying
of britain's biggest media empire, rupert murdoch, is to make his first appearance before a committee of british members of parliament on tuesday to face questioning about the phone hacking scandal at the "news of the world." his son james will also give evidence, and will the former boss, rebekah brooks. the scandal has already forced two a senior police officers to resign. >> he is ben yates of the are no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, sir paul stevenson. both paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal. so said the mayor of london. >> i regret to say i have just come off the phone john yates, who tendered his resignation. >> boras johnson said both men had jumped and were not pushed. but he made it clear he had done everything he could to encourage them. >> it is a concatenation of issues and questions. it is going to make it very difficult for them to continue to do their jobs in the way they wanted. >> yates began the day determined not to resign, telling colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he ended it explaining why he was go
. >> as the investigation gets under way, britain has promised intelligence cooperation. forensic, eyewitness accounts and telephone analysis will all be fed in. the unanswered questions are, who was behind this and why? >> richard capt. is on his way to the island of -- richard galpin is on his way to the island of utoeya. he filed this report. >> they fear there may be more bodies in the water. boats are searching. we know that when the gunmen opened fire on this island, there was huge panic. there's got to be something like 600-700 people who were on the island at the time. some of them took to the water and tried to swim away. there is a fear that more bodies will be found in the water. those in the red cross were saying to me that there may also be more victims inside the building where the bomb explosion took place in the mid afternoon here in central oslo because it is difficult for the emergency services to get inside the building. there is a concern that there might be more bombs in the area. there has been very significant damage to the building, so it is dangerous from that point of view fo
on a general basis that so far we don't have any evidence of another cell either in norway or in britain. >> for now, norway's focus is on the dead and those still missing. each evening the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all who have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> norway's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to breivik's attacks. there were questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the island where the killer went on the rampage. europe has been to the island and spoke to some of the rescuers. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are people still waiting with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a campsite in their small boats. they launch their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was that they don't trust us. they shout from the water, "can i trust you?
: newscorp chief executive rupert murdoch is apologizing to all of britain for the phone hacking scandal involving his "news of the world" tabloid. the apology will be carried in british newspapers this weekend with the headline "we are sorry." also today, two executives of murdoch's british newspaper operations resigned because of the scandal. rebekah brooks, the chief executive of news international, and dow jones c.e.o. les hinton stepped down. >> tom: norwegian cruise lines is setting sail for the stock market. the miami-based company filed for an initial public stock offering today. it hopes to raise $250 million to repay debt. no word on when it will come to market, but it will trade on nasdaq under the ticker n-c-l-h. also heading the nasdaq? zillow. the real estate listing service today detailed its stock offering plans. it hopes to raise $71 million by selling 3.5 million shares priced as high as $18 a share. it gets the coveted single- letter ticker "z." >> susie: even though investors have a long worry list, tonight's "market monitor" is still optimistic about the outlook for
, particularly in great britain and elsewhere. >> it's a huge issue in europe. muslim immigration is a huge issue in europe. in france and it's been that way -- when i was a student in france, it was a huge issue back then. it's a huge issue in germany with the turks. they have three million turks who are living in isolated communities. it's one of reasons germany would never accept turkey into the european union. so it's a very critical issue to european politics. >> it's a seminole moment for the right wing party in europe because they've been exploiting fears about immigration and fears of their culling tour being submerged by all of the immigrants. and now they really are rushing to distance themselves from this fellow, and i think people are doing -- same kind of self- examine we did after the shooting of gabby giffords, is the kind of inflammatory rhetoric is that appropriate in politics? >> why would -- >> there's been an explosion of these right wing, populous parties, gotten contact with a true fins who just had a tremendous victory. the new party is just come up in sweden. but it's all
: but tour earlier point perhaps the end game is to get full control of b. sky b. in britain for the satellite broadcasting, a $19 billion deal, if it is able to get clarify for that deal, what does it mean for news corp. shareholders? >> that would potentially be a nice boost. i think that it is certainly something that any media investor knows right now is something that's very important from the vantage point of news corp.. news corp., like many other media companies, including the parent of time warner, is a challenging environment right now from an advertiser's standpoint, eve 2010 the economy slowly picking up. and the beauty of the satellite is that you get all of these fees that come in addition to ad revenue, that's why it's such a lucrative business, not just in the u. k. but around the world. >> tom: paul, we appreciate the insight, thanks for sharing it with us. paul la monica, author of "inside rupert's brain. " >> susie: here in the u.s., a federal appeals court today reinstated a ban on media companies owning both a newspaper and a television station in the sam
company british sky broadcasting. the deal has come under a full- scale inquiry by britain's competition commission. separately, newscorp today withdrew its offer to spin off sky news if the b. sky b. deal is approved. >> susie: while washington is focused on the debt debate, tonight's commentator wants to have a bigger conversation about growth. he's glenn hubbard, dean of the graduate school of business at columbia and former top economic advisor to president george w. bush. >> our current national debate over fiscal austerity masks a conversation we need to have about growth-- to raise incomes and create jobs. faster growth doesn't just happen. a supportive policy environment is needed. we need to encourage participation in the workforce and to provide education and training that match the skills required for today and tomorrow. the productivity of our workforce also depends on the plant and equipment and software businesses have. we need tax reform to promote that investment. growth is powerful. at a 3% growth rate that we can achieve over time, average incomes will double between a
of public workers took to the streets in britain to protest pension cuts. their union is warning the one- day strike could be the beginning of a wave of strikes. still ahead, how best to invest over the next decade, especially with stocks sitting close to where they were ten years ago. new claims for jobless benefits fell by a thousand in the past week to 428,000. they haven't dipped below the 400,000 mark since april. and with many worried about a summer soft-patch for the economy, former president bill clinton is trying to boost job creation. this week, he's in chicago for his annual clinton global initiative. the goal-- bringing together leaders from businesses, non-profits and government to brainstorm on how to get america back to work. former michigan governor jennifer granholm is one of those leaders at the event. she says businesses make decisions every day about where to locate, and if we want those jobs here in the u.s., we need to get busy. >> they're not going to places out of loyalty or staying here out of loyalty; they're going where they can maximize their profits. we have
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)